How to Maintain a Health Diet

In today’s day and age it is extremely important that you focus on ways to maintain a safe and healthy lifestyle and diet. The first step in this process is simple: don’t get caught up in diet fads. As fads come and go, it is important to guarantee that you’re adding easy components to your diet that will keep you healthy and fit.

Always make sure to keep your diet packed with a variety of foods: fruits, vegetables, low- fat dairy products, whole grains, lean proteins, and healthy fats (such as avocados, nuts, fatty fish, and flaxseed). All of these components together can help you stay balanced.

Make sure to buy food that is grown locally within your community, and to always stay within the means of your lifestyle and budget. The purpose of maintaining a healthy diet is to work within the limits of your pre-consisting lifestyle. This is the best possible way to ensure the endurance and overall success for the rest of your life.

 For more information please check out this link: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/basics/healthy-diets/hlv-20049477

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In today’s day and age it is extremely important that you focus on ways to maintain a safe and healthy lifestyle and diet. The first step in this process is simple: don’t get caught up in diet fads. As fads come and go, it is important to guarantee that you’re adding easy components to your diet that will keep you healthy and fit.

Always make sure to keep your diet packed with a variety of foods: fruits, vegetables, low- fat dairy products, whole grains, lean proteins, and healthy fats (such as avocados, nuts, fatty fish, and flaxseed). All of these components together can help you stay balanced.

Make sure to buy food that is grown locally within your community, and to always stay within the means of your lifestyle and budget. The purpose of maintaining a healthy diet is to work within the limits of your pre-consisting lifestyle. This is the best possible way to ensure the endurance and overall success for the rest of your life.

 For more information please check out this link: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/basics/healthy-diets/hlv-20049477

Take the thinking out of meal prep, suggests trainer Brett Hoebel: Find a few fast, healthy recipes for each meal of the day and keep the ingredients on hand.

It's time to put up or shut up. But that doesn't mean you have to go for broke eating healthy. The myth that eating healthy is too costly is just that: a myth. Here's the truth behind the lies about healthy eating and what it will cost you.

When it comes to eating healthy, decision is the ultimate power. Make the decision to lead a healthy lifestyle and become powerful instead of powerless.

The Money

I can't tell you how many times I've heard people say, "fast food is the cheapest option in my neighborhood," or "I really can't afford to eat healthy right now." The fact is a $2 bag of brown rice, $15 package of chicken and $10 in bulk veggies can feed a family of four for an entire week! This option costs much less than a $4 fast food meal each weeknight (if you can find a fast food meal that cheap these days).

Get real. There are far too many programs, web apps and meal plans that will literally show you how to eat healthy on a budget, so don't knock it until you actually try it!

The Time

"I don't have time," you say? Please … do I really have to list all the screen time on the Internet we use up doing absolutely nothing for our health? Not mention our drive time and leisure time going to waste.

Incorporate planning for meals into your daily routine, and multi-task when you can. Cooking takes up valuable time, so if you are working hard throughout the week, I suggest preparing meals in bulk on a day off, and keeping a go-to list of quick recipes for breakfast, lunch or dinner so you can make healthy meals on the go.

The Taste

"These vegetables are bland," It continues to shock me how many people dislike whole foods and exchange them for processed ones. But guess what all of the processed foods try to mimic? The taste of whole foods.

 

Skittles are fruit-flavored, but a natural kiwi, mango, and peach are so tasty without any additives. Tossed vegetables with herbs and olive oil are divine, but we give them up for bland-tasting fried potatoes drenched in ketchup – talk about bland.

Don't believe the hype: Healthy food IS tasty, and unhealthy food is some of the most bland stuff on the planet. That's why the ample amounts of salt, sugar and other additives have to be added to processed foods – they don't have any flavor! So don't get fooled. Taste can be altered. Just take the time to find the best recipes for healthy foods that meet your taste expectations.

Grocery Shopping Tips

• Avoid the white devils – white sugar, white milk, white rice, white salt and white flour.

• Focus on lean, healthy protein like chicken or fish, loads of fruits, veggies and nuts and a huge helping of H2O!

• Stick to brown or wild rice if necessary, and choose almond milk over dairy when you can.

• Use unprocessed, Himalayan salt and a healthy dose of fresh herbs and spices for seasoning.

• Purchase healthy fats like coconut oil, egg and avocado.

The Steps to Eating Healthy at All Costs

1. Skip the four-syllable ingredients: If you can't imagine your breakfast bar growing out of the ground, falling off of a tree or running around in the wild, it probably isn't a whole food! A nutrition label with ingredients you can't pronounce is a processed mess you should avoid. My rule of thumb: three ingredients or less, period.

2. Stay away from packages: A general rule of thumb is the more packaging, the more processed. If you can pick up the piece of produce or have the butcher pass you the meat, you are in good shape. Frozen, dried, canned, bagged or boxed food is usually not whole food. Be very wary of terminology like "all-natural," "natural-tasting," "lite" or "low-calorie." Whole foods don't need a marketing campaign; they're healthy, and you know it.

3. Check the expiration date: If the product doesn't expire until next year and is from a land far, far away, it is likely chock full of nasty preservatives. If it doesn't expire on the shelf for months and months, what makes you think your stomach will easily digest it?

The first step is always the hardest because it takes a few weeks for your body to get used to the new way of eating, and many people have withdraws and cravings in the beginning. Instead of focusing on the food, focus on your positivity and health, and keep smiling. After four weeks of eating healthy, you will become happier and more energized. In twelve weeks, your family and friends will notice the difference and need to know your secret.

You are what you eat. Sound off…

By: Brett Hoebel

Orginal Article: http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/essential-tips-eating-healthy-budget-article-1.1528712

If you want to boost your heart health, start by changing what’s on your plate. Making simple tweaks could have big benefits.
  • Believe the hype. You've heard a lot about eating heart-healthy, but does it really matter? Yes. One study of more than 42,000 healthy women found that those who ate a healthy diet -- with an emphasis on vegetables, lean meats, grains, and low-fat dairy -- were 31% less likely to die in the next 6 years than women with unhealthy diets.
  • Don't diet. A crash diet may work if you're trying to fit into a dress by next month. But if you're trying to improve your heart health, cycling through different fad diets won't help. Diets that demonize one type of food -- whether it's carbs or fat -- don't work either. Instead, take a sensible approach. Focus on lean meats, vegetables, and whole grains to get long-term benefits for your heart and your waistline.   
  • Don't gorge yourself. Obviously, overeating will cause you to gain weight. That's not all. Studies have found that more people have heart attacks after big meals.
  • Sea salt is still salt. Most Americans think sea salt is a low-sodium alternative to regular table salt. Wrong. It has the same amount of sodium. Any type of salt increases your blood pressure. You probably need to eat less salt; most people do. The guideline is no more than a teaspoon a day. If you already have high blood pressure, you should eat even less. And, it doesn’t just come from the salt shaker. Up to 75% of the salt you consume comes from processed foods such as soups and frozen meals. If your food comes in a can or a box, check the sodium content. 
  • Avoid caffeine. If you have atrial fibrillation, caffeine and other stimulants can trigger symptoms.
  • A little wine may be good, but a lot is not. Yes, studies show that drinking modest amounts of alcohol -- not just wine -- has heart benefits. But don't assume that if a glass is good, a jug must be better. Excess alcohol -- more than one drink a day for women or two for men -- increases your risk for heart problems. It drives up blood pressure and can trigger irregular heartbeats in people with atrial fibrillation.
  • Choose meats wisely. Red meat is usually high in saturated fat, which is bad for your heart. That doesn't mean you have to banish meat from your diet. Just be savvy. Choose the leanest cuts and always cut off the fat. Look for cuts such as sirloin, flank, rump roast, and tenderloin. Or, choose pork tenderloin, turkey or chicken breast, as an alternative.
  • Add more fish to your diet. You probably know that fish is good for you -- but not all fish is equal. Deep-fried cod doesn't count. Instead, grill or roast fish that is high in healthy omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon, tuna, trout, and sardines.
  • Eat whole grains. What's so special about whole grains? They help control your blood sugar, reducing your risk of diabetes by 20% to 30%. People who eat a lot of whole grains tend to weigh less, too. Go for whole-wheat breads, brown rice, wild rice, oatmeal, cornmeal, barley, and rye.
  • Eat less deli. Think that a smoked turkey sandwich is a healthier choice than a burger? Don't be so sure. Deli meats are often packed with salts, nitrates, and preservatives that can be bad for your heart. Instead, go for whole chicken breasts or in-house roasted turkey.
  • Eat less when eating out. Experts say we're eating too many calories. Restaurant portion sizes may have a lot to do with it. According to the CDC, the amount of food in one average restaurant meal today is like four average restaurant meals from the 1950s. Studies have also found that the bigger the portion served, the more we'll eat. The solution? Get in the habit of only eating half of what's on your plate. You can take the rest home.
  • Fill up on fiber. Fiber absorbs fat during digestion and reduces swelling in your arteries. It also helps with weight control because it makes you feel full faster -- and improves your digestive health. What's not to like? Fruit, vegetables, nuts, and beans are all good sources of fiber.
  • Note: If you have atrial fibrillation or another condition treated with an anticoagulant like Coumadin (warfarin), be on the alert for vegetables with vitamin K. This vitamin can reduce the drug's effectiveness. Veggies with vitamin K include Brussels sprouts, cabbage, collard greens, kale, mustard greens, spinach, and turnip greens. If you eat these foods, keep the amount you eat about the same from day to day. If you want to add any of these foods to your diet, talk to your doctor first. You may be able to introduce small amounts slowly.

The good news is that these actions help everyone -- whether you're trying to prevent heart problems in the future, are already living with high blood pressure or high cholesterol, or have a problem like atrial fibrillation, which often results from a diet-related heart problem.

The best news is: It's never too early -- or too late -- to improve your diet and heart health.

Article by: WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by James Beckerman, MD, FACC on August 02, 2012

Original Source: http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/atrial-fibrillation/afib-12/heart-diet?page=2

 

 

American Diet Trends

 

                  When you first make the decision to lose weight, a few words come to mind: exercise and diet. There have been many diet trends all over the world, but America can take the cake (no pun intended) on some of the more interesting and beneficial diet trends. Here are six of the most popular:

 

  1. Choosing water over other sugary drinks
  2. Increasing your intake of fruits and vegetables
  3. Decreasing trans-fat in your diet
  4. NO fast food
  5. Eating a lot of nuts
  6. Consumer fewer calories

 

Many of these "diet hacks" have worked for Americans, helping them improve their lifestyle. The ultimate trick to maintaining a diet is finding one that works continuously for you. If anything, try some of the trends listed and see if there is something that you can stick with.

 

For more information on this topic, read this article http://www.cnn.com/2015/07/30/health/gallery/american-diet-trends/index.html